Posts Tagged Under: tea ceremony

    2016/4/30
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koi travel, tea ceremony

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Tea ceremony was developed as a social activity among high-class men. They gathered and discussed various topics with a course of meal and tea. Senrikyu established that gathering as an ceremonial art in 16th century, having defined the manner and encouraged participants to appreciate the decoration and equipment used during the ceremony. Tea ceremony since 17th century functioned like salons in France in 18-19th century where people exchanged cultural and intellectual knowledge.

Today, tea ceremony is regarded one of the most important art in Japan because it is a comprehensive art that forms bases of Japanese art. Many other arts like room decorations, flower arrangements, calligraphy, tea related equipment, kaiseki dishes and sweets were invented or improved as tea ceremony was developed. Read More

    2016/2/29
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koicha

koicha, thick green tea

usucha

usucha, thin green tea

Today, Japanese regard tea ceremony as a representative example of traditional Japanese culture. The full ceremony takes around four hours and it is composed with the first greeting, a course meal called kaiseki, sweet, sake (Japanese rice wine), short break to enjoy walking in the garden, thick green tea (koi-cha; three times thicker than normal matcha and its texture reminds us of potage soup), thin green tea (usu-cha; formed matcha green tea that we often see), appreciating decoration and equipment and the last greetung. There are so many rules to follow about behaviors and fashion, which are slightly Read More

    2016/1/31
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You may have tried green tea or matcha at Japanese café or somewhere else. Yes, it is the vivid green color tea with creamy forms on the surface. It is bitter and contains caffeine, a bit stronger than black tea. In order to enjoy matcha, put matcha powder, which is crushed green tea leaves, in tea bowl and pour hot water (approximately 85℃) in it. Then stir it quickly by using special bamboo-made whisk until smooth form covers the surface of the bowl.

Green tea was brought from China by Buddhist monks around 8th century. It was taken only among aristocracies and was regarded as medicine. It is said drinking match spread widely by late 12th century with the spread of Buddhism Read More